Understanding Choroidal Detachment in the Eye

 

Choroidal Detachment pic

Choroidal Detachment
Image: webmd.com

Guided by Cameron Javid, MD, Retina Associates is a Tucson, Arizona practice that provides a full range of ophthalmologic treatments. Among the areas in which the Retina Associates team has extensive knowledge is the retina and choroid.

The eye’s vascular layer, the choroid is spongy and contains blood vessels and connective tissues that extend along the eye’s back wall. It has a vital role in providing the retina’s outer half with needed nutrients and oxygen.

One concern with the choroid is detachment, with blood or fluid pushing it away from its position flush against the sclera, the white of the eye. This detachment occasionally involves severe pain, and may cause achy eyes, or have no symptoms at all.

There are two major types of choroidal detachments, hemorrhagic (blood filled) and serous (fluid filled). Tied to high intraocular pressure, hemorrhagic choroidal detachments often involve a painful bursting of the choroidal blood vessel.

By contrast, serous choroidal detachments are related to low eye pressure and are rarely more than mildly uncomfortable. Treatment of this condition centers on the use of eye drops to dilate the pupil and reduce inflammation. Small postoperative choroidal detachments often heal on their own. Both conditions may require surgery.

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