About Age-Related Macular Degeneration

Retina Associates pic

Retina Associates
Image: retinatucson.com

Retina Associates provides specialized care for retinal abnormalities to patients in Tucson, Arizona. Through Retina Associates, Dr. Cameron Javid and his fellow physicians treat numerous individuals with macular degeneration.

Age-related macular degeneration, or AMD, is the most common cause of vision loss in the United States today. It stems from the deterioration of an area known as the macula, which lies in the center of the retina at the back of the eye. In a healthy human eye, the macula is responsible for receiving and processing information from the patient’s central field of vision.

Because the retina is responsible for translating light into signals that the brain can read as vision, its degeneration can be devastating to a patient. Macular cells that no longer function can in turn no longer correctly tell the brain what the individual is seeing. This manifests as blurriness, image distortion, or even darkening in the affected visual field.

In most cases, this process occurs because the macula begins to gradually thin with age. At first, this does not cause noticeable symptoms but instead prompts the development of small deposits under the retina, which an ophthalmologist may notice on examination. Vision loss then slowly begins and worsens as damage increases.

Dry macular degeneration may progress into the disease’s wet form, which occurs as a result of abnormal blood vessel growth under the retina. These vessels are structurally unsound and leak into the retina, which in turn can cause rapid and severe vision loss. Wet macular degeneration requires timely medical treatment, so that a retina specialist can treat the condition with injections of medicine into the eye or cold laser.

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